Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise

UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School

DeSimone to speak on IP strategies at Partnering for Cures conference

11/20/2012

Joe DeSimone, director of UNC-Chapel Hill's Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, will give an inventor’s perspective on medical technology transfer Nov. 29 at Partnering for Cures in New York City.

The fourth annual event convenes all of the sectors involved in moving medical discoveries to market. It is hosted by FasterCures, a Washington, D.C-based center of the Milken Institute that works to accelerate the process of discovery and development of new medical solutions for deadly and debilitating diseases.

DeSimone will join other national experts for a panel discussion on “License to drive (innovation): IP strategies to support, not slow, progress.” He will share his experience and views on the intellectual property landscape, actions policymakers, funders and others can do to smooth the way for commercialization and the role of research universities in the process.

DeSimone is professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and professor of chemical engineering at N.C. State University. He holds more than 130 issued patents in his name and more than 80 patents pending. In 2004, he launched Liquidia Technologies, which has raised more than $60 million in venture financing, including the first-ever equity investment by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in a for-profit biotech company.

DeSimone’s research group focuses on harnessing the fabrication technologies from the semiconductor industry to design high-performance, cost-effective vaccines and medicines. He is an adjunct member at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and member of both the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering.

The Kenan Institute, part of the UNC-Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, pursues cutting-edge research, educational programs and public policy initiatives in the areas of entrepreneurship, economic development and global competitiveness. For more information, visit www.kenaninstitute.unc.edu or call (919) 962-8201.